To improve your experience on Lilly TrialGuide, please use the latest version of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, or Internet Explorer, with JavaScript enabled.
This website is not optimized for your browser, as configured.
Participation

Clinical Research Enrollment Demand

Clinical Research Enrollment Demand Feature Image

Editor's Note: Rahlyn Gossen is the founder and principal of Rebar Interactive, a digital patient engagement and recruitment company serving clinical trial sponsors and research sites. Prior to founding Rebar, Rahlyn was a clinical research coordinator. Her observations as a coordinator greatly influence her perspective on clinical trials as well as Rebar’s technology products and services, which aim to reduce inefficiency and improve the patient experience. Rahlyn frequently writes and speaks about clinical trial innovation and is on the editorial advisory board for Applied Clinical Trials.

rahlyn photo

Of the challenges in clinical research, participant enrollment remains one of the biggest. According to the Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development, clinical trial enrollment typically ends up taking two-times longer than planned. These delays drive up the costs to develop new treatments and hinder medical advancement.

Often, the discussion about enrollment delays focuses on supply challenges, such as how patients learn about clinical trials and what helps or hinders them from participating in clinical research. But understanding enrollment demand is equally important to this equation. In order to work toward an enrollment target, we must first know what target we’d like to hit. With this target in mind, we’re in a better position to figure out the steps needed to achieve it. And that brings us to this question: how many people are needed for currently enrolling research studies? 

What did we learn? At the time of this blog post’s publication, the data show that:

  1. Enrollment demand is huge. We need many people to participate in clinical research—to the tune of over 57 million.
  2. Demand for people to enroll in studies is not distributed equally across diseases or phases. For example, nearly half of the enrollment need for cardiovascular disease is in Phase 4 studies.

Take a look to see for yourself! What do you find interesting? Any insights you’d like to share? Tell us what you think by @-mentioning us on Twitter.

ClinicalResearchEnrollmentDemand Infographic 1Aug2019-01

Blog post originally appeared on LillyPad.

Tags: Infographic,

Recent Articles

TheCOVID-19PandemicChangedHowSitesConductClinicalTrialsForever FeatureImage 22July2021-01

The COVID-19 Pandemic Changed How Sites Conduct Clinical Trials Forever

Kevin Hudziak Photo
Kevin Hudziak
July 29th, 20213 minute read

To better understand how various countries adapted to execute clinical trials during a pandemic, we conducted a series of virtual feedback sessions with clinicians from all over the world.

ThePathFromHCPtoResearcher FeatureImage 24Feb2021-01

The Path from HCP to Researcher: A Word of Advice

LTGBlogAuthors LillyGuestAuthorIcon 20July2018
Lilly Guest Author
April 21st, 20215 minute read

If you’re a physician interested in getting involved in clinical research, you must understand that it can be a big career shift. Luckily, Kamnesh Pradhan has valuable advice to share.

WeMustIncreaseDiversityInClinicalTrials FeatureImage 24Feb2021-01

Paving the Way to Better Diversity in Clinical Trials

LTGBlogAuthors LillyGuestAuthorIcon 20July2018
Lilly Guest Author
February 26th, 20218 minute read

To discuss what Lilly is doing to increase diversity in clinical trials, we spoke with two outstanding women who are leading the charge.

ResourcesToHelpAspiringClinicalResearchers FeatureImage 3Feb2021-01

Resources to Help Aspiring Clinical Researchers

Leigh Anne Naas Headshot
Leigh Anne Naas
February 10th, 20214 minute read

If you’re thinking about becoming a clinical researcher, it might be hard to know where to begin. We’ve outlined several resources to help you understand what to expect in a clinical research role.

StudyCoordinatorPatientPartnerThroughClinicalTrials FeatureImage 15Dec2020

Study Coordinator: Patient Partner Through Clinical Trials

LTGBlogAuthors GuestAuthorIcon 20July2018
Guest Author
January 13th, 20217 minute read

Study coordinators are a key part of the clinical trial journey. To learn more about what they do, read our interview with study coordinator, Kelly Roberts.